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Ladakh - Planning The Trip

Over 2000 Km by road, in around 10 days. Stunning landscapes, wonderful people. That sums up our Ladakh trip. But how did it actually work? How did we make it happen? Read on to find out!  Leh, the capital of Ladakh , is accessible by air and road. Flying into Leh is the easiest, and time-saving option, while the road is the time consuming one, but with the added advantage of driving past some of the most beautiful landscapes in our country. Each option has much to recommend it, and we chose the road for just one reason – altitude sickness. Altitude sickness was one of my biggest concerns, since I suffer from motion-sickness. Yes, I do travel a lot, but that is despite my condition, and, over the years, have learnt how to handle it. I struggled with it when we visited Nathu-La in Sikkim, and wondered if I would be able to manage a week at the even higher altitudes that we would encounter in Ladakh. This was the reason we stuck to a basic plan, of only 9 days in Ladakh, though we

Skywatch Friday - Images from Badami


Badami was the capital of the early Chalukyas, from the 6th to the 8th century AD. The city was then known as Vatapi.

The name came from the legend of Sage Agasthya who destroyed the demons Vatapi and Ilvala here. As the story goes, Vatapi and Ilvala were demon brothers. Vatapi had a boon from the gods that no matter how many pieces his body was cut into, when called, they would join and he would be whole and alive. Taking advantage of this, the brothers tricked all sages who passed by their region. They would invite them for a feast, an invitation which could not be refused. Then Vatapi would turn into a ram and Ilvala would cut him up and serve him to the guests (in those days, even sages ate meat).
Once the sage had eaten, Ilvala would call out to his brother, and Vatapi would emerge from the bowels of the sage, whole, killing the sage in the process. When the sage Agasthya arrived on the scene, they tried the same trick on him. However, Agasthya was among the greatest of sages and could not be tricked. As soon as he completed his meal, he rubbed his full stomach and said, “Vatapi, be digested!” at which command, the individual pieces of Vatapi were at once digested, and no longer remained free to re-join! Ilvala as usual called out to Vatapi again and again but to no avail. The sage got angry when Ilvala tried to attack him, and killed him easily. It is believed that the huge rocks which make up the mountains around city are the remains of the two demons. The lake amidst the mountains is believed to have been created by the sage, and is named after him as Agasthya Lake, or Agasthya Teertha.

The modern name for the city, Badami, is believed to come from the rocky red sandstone outcrop which surrounds the city…. The red colour resembles that of almonds (badam).

Here are some of my images of Badami....

The mountains, the lake and the city



From the other side..

View of the city from the abandoned and ruined fort!


The placid waters of Lake Agasthya

another view of the lake.. against the backdrop of the forests which have disappeared due to mining
For more beautiful images from around the world, go to the Sky Watch Page


Badami Factfile
  • Location: Badami is located in Karnataka, 30 Kms from Bagalkot and 589 Km from Bangalore
  • Nearest Airport: Belgaum, 190 Km
  • Nearest Railway station: Hubli, 100 Km
  • Accomodation: There are plenty of options for staying in Badami, but most of them are lodges and low to medium end hotels. The best is certainly the Karnataka Tourism hotel Maurya Chalukya
  • Around Badami:    
    • Bijapur – 125 Km
    • Aihole – 46 Km
    • Pattadakkal – 29 Km
    • Hospet – 190 Km



Comments

  1. Very nice Photos

    Beertje Zonn

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  2. Lovely captures.

    www.rajniranjandas.blogspot.com

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    ReplyDelete
  4. Beautiful place and beautiful pictures.

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  5. Interesting post and nice shots, would love to visit Badami

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  6. Thanks Vinay! Its a beautiful place! am sure u will love it!

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  7. these fotos are quite stunning.
    i never knew there was this interesting place hidden in India.
    hopefully, my feet could take me there sometime. ^0^

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  8. Great view..I would love to be there with my camera..! Nice captures Anu..!

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  9. Thanks a lot! I hope you get to come and see them sometime!

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  10. you would love the place, Sridharan! go sometime!

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  11. was in Badami during childhood. Have no photos.. seeing yous and Arun Bhat's photos, feeling the need to revisit

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  12. I visited Badami last year around this time. Your post and photos brought back wonderful memories. Looking forward to reading the detailed travelogue. :-)

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  13. Thanks Srinidhi..... Arun's photos were what inspired me to combine Badami with my Hampi trip! I couldnt possibly go all that way and come back without visiting such a wonderful place!! you should go soon!

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  14. Tatjana ParkachevaAugust 28, 2011 at 10:02 PM

    Nice photos.

    Regards!

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  15. Badami is world class destination, if one gets to stay, than it is worth it.  Did you reach Badami while it was raining photos are little dull

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  16.  Beautiful place! Interesting story, and the captures are terrific!

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  17. No Umesh! it was terribly hot, which is why the glare makes the photos appear dull!

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  18. Thanks Arti! you would love the place!

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