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Ladakh - Planning The Trip

Over 2000 Km by road, in around 10 days. Stunning landscapes, wonderful people. That sums up our Ladakh trip. But how did it actually work? How did we make it happen? Read on to find out!  Leh, the capital of Ladakh , is accessible by air and road. Flying into Leh is the easiest, and time-saving option, while the road is the time consuming one, but with the added advantage of driving past some of the most beautiful landscapes in our country. Each option has much to recommend it, and we chose the road for just one reason – altitude sickness. Altitude sickness was one of my biggest concerns, since I suffer from motion-sickness. Yes, I do travel a lot, but that is despite my condition, and, over the years, have learnt how to handle it. I struggled with it when we visited Nathu-La in Sikkim, and wondered if I would be able to manage a week at the even higher altitudes that we would encounter in Ladakh. This was the reason we stuck to a basic plan, of only 9 days in Ladakh, though we

Kushinagar




You have been reading my travelogues for around 3 years now, so here's something new for all of you. 


That mine was a family of wanderers is something all of you know very well by now. All of us jump at any chance to travel, but I am the only one who has been jotting down my experiences. Recently, one of my maternal uncles has taken to writing his experiences too. He works for the Airport Authority of India, and gets to travel a lot, looking for sites for new airports and sites where work is in progress. Thus, he gets to go to places which are out of the way, yet of tourist interest. When I asked him to start writing his own blog, he suggested that maybe I could use his travelogues on mine. Needless to say, I was thrilled. So here's the first one - his account of his visit to Kushinagar in September.

Kushinagar 


I had an opportunity to visit to Kushinagar in Uttar Pradesh, in connection with construction of an international airport at Kushinagar. I was surprised to witness a wealth of Buddhist religion thriving in this remote village, which is lacking in basic amenities and lack of regular power supply. However, the place is full of greeneries and nature at its best.  Apart from agriculture and tourism (particularly Buddhist) from India and Asian countries, the place has nothing to boast about.


Though, the State of Uttar Pradesh is home to 6 world class sacred sites associated with the life of Lord Buddha, namely Sarnath, Kushinagar, Sravasti, Kapilvastu, Kaushambi and Sankisa, Kushinagar is the place where Lord Buddha achieved salvation. During his last few hours, Buddha desired to leave his corporeal body at the Sal grove on the banks of the Hiranyavati river in Kushinagar. This is one of the 6 main Buddhist centres of Uttar Pradesh frequented by pilgrims from East Asia, South East Asia and South Asia. The Mahaparinirvana temple here enshrines a 6 metre long statue of the Buddha in the Parinirvana posture.  



A very large statue of Buddha, carved on a single piece of red sandstone is situated here. The great Mauryan Emperor, Ashoka, built this statue. All three famous Chinese scholars Fa Hien, Huen Tsang, and I-tsing visited Kushinagar, which is a part of the famous Buddhist trail encompassing Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, and Nepal. Buddha Poornima is the most important festival celebrated in the region.








Kushinagar is an immensely popular pilgrimage site for Buddhists. There are several temples of various countries in the vicinity, such as Watt Thai Temple, Japanese Temple, Chinese Temple etc.
    





Kushinagar is also known as the city of beautiful Stupas and Temples and considered to be one of the Holy Places in India. From Buddhist followers to the Indian devotees, this is one of the major pilgrimage destinations in Uttar Pradesh.



Referred to as the Kushinara in ancient period, the city is a storehouse of architectural marvels. Archaeological excavations have unearthed a number of temples and Stupas which belonged to medieval India.







Topography, Geography and climate
Kushinagar, is thinly populated and the surrounding area is largely flat agricultural land. Ideal season for the tourists is between Oct to March. The climate is similar to that of north India. In summers the temperature goes upto 45̊ C and in winters it is around 5̊ C. As far as accommodation is concerned, U.P. Govt. is having a well maintained hotel (Patik Niwas) and there are other good private hotels available. Nearest railway station and airport is Gorakhpur, which is 51 km from Kushinagar.
Tourists normally visit through conducted tour/ package by travel companies. 


Here are some more photographs taken during the visit.













And finally, here's one of the author himself - he's the one facing the camera.....



                                                      
Posted on behalf of K.S.Raghuraman

Comments

  1. Great post. I love reading about these usually unadvertised places in India.

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  2. I have been there many times in school! I belong to a nearby place :D

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  3. Liked Khushinagar, I don't think I would go to that place , so this was like a virtual trip

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  4. @Lost Wanderer: Thanks.... as to unadvertised, well, it s getting more attention these days... in fact,there is also a train to visit all the Buddhist sites... its gaining popularity...

    @Mridula : Oh, you grew up around there??? I havent been there yet....

    @Chitra: never say never... you never know where u might land up!!! at least thats what i prefer to think.....

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  5. if i am not mistaken khushinagar is in bihar,right...???

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  6. @Sonam: No, it is not in Bihar, but UP. its somewhat on the border, so is approachable from Bihar too,

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  7. i love kushinagar b"coz its my birth place n i spend my childhood in kushinagar.

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  8. i love kushinagar becouse its my birth place n i spend my childhood in kushinagar.

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