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Ladakh - Planning The Trip

Over 2000 Km by road, in around 10 days. Stunning landscapes, wonderful people. That sums up our Ladakh trip. But how did it actually work? How did we make it happen? Read on to find out!  Leh, the capital of Ladakh , is accessible by air and road. Flying into Leh is the easiest, and time-saving option, while the road is the time consuming one, but with the added advantage of driving past some of the most beautiful landscapes in our country. Each option has much to recommend it, and we chose the road for just one reason – altitude sickness. Altitude sickness was one of my biggest concerns, since I suffer from motion-sickness. Yes, I do travel a lot, but that is despite my condition, and, over the years, have learnt how to handle it. I struggled with it when we visited Nathu-La in Sikkim, and wondered if I would be able to manage a week at the even higher altitudes that we would encounter in Ladakh. This was the reason we stuck to a basic plan, of only 9 days in Ladakh, though we

St. Philomena's Church, Mysore

The twin spires of the church towering over the trees and the houses grab my attention, and my auto driver tells me it is the St. Philomena’s Church. “You have been in Mysore for a week and haven’t seen it yet?” he exclaims, and proceeds to rectify my grave error in not paying a visit to this landmark of Mysore.




“Don’t miss the crypt” he insists, as he drops me outside, and later, after parking his vehicle, follows me to make sure I have seen all there is to see. It is evident that he is proud of this church, and, as I soon realize, he has due reason to be.



The St. Philomena’s Church is one of the largest churches in India, and it was first built in 1843 to serve the British officers stationed at Mysore and Srirangapatna. That was a simple, wooden structure, which lasted over a century, before plans were laid down for a new, majestic structure in 1933. The present church, completed in 1936, was designed by the French architect, Daly, in the Neo Gothic style, and is modelled after the Cologne Cathedral in Germany.



The church is dedicated to St. Philomena, a Grecian Princess who was martyred in the 4th century. It is said that she was the daughter of a Greek monarch, born after much prayer. As a child, she was very pious, and showed signs of greatness. When she was 13, her parents took her to Rome to obtain the favour of the Emperor, who, as it turned out, was enamoured by her beauty and wished to marry her. She refused, choosing instead to dedicate herself to God. As a result, she was imprisoned, tortured, and eventually, beheaded, in Rome. Her relics were found centuries later in one of the Roman catacombs, and, in 1926, Thamboo Chetty, the secretary of the Maharaja of Mysore, obtained one of these relics to house in the church by her name.



Inside the church is the altar with a statue of the saint, and an idol of Christ. Above the altar are beautiful stained glass windows from France, depicting stories from the Bible.  Near the altar are steps which lead us to the crypt below, where the relics of the saint are preserved. Walking into the crypt is an eerie experience, but a memorable one. The casket containing the relics seems to exude its aura, enveloping visitors, believers and non-believers alike. The names of the thousands whose remains lie interred all around, seem to call out their stories. I find myself wondering who they were, and what stories they could tell me, if only I could find a way to listen to them.


Emerging from the crypt into the sunshine, I take a deep breath, and strain to look up at the high turrets of the church. The sun glints over the stone and the glass, and I am happy I made this detour.

It is an interesting church indeed – dedicated to a Greek saint, built by a French architect, for the British soldiers, in the German style, paid for by a Hindu king!



Information:
  • Location: The church is located about 3 Km from the Mysore Bus stand and 2 Km from the Mysore Palace.

  • Timings: The church is open from 5 AM to 6 PM, every day. Mass is held every morning and evening, and special masses are held on Sundays and festivals.
  • Entry is free.
  • Photography is allowed outside, but not inside the church


Comments

  1. Love this Gothic church though I have not been there. Nice post on it with all those details.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Niranjan! Next time you are in Mysore, you should certainly go there!

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  2. Hi, We're having summer vacation trip in Mysore with family on may of this year and I'm so exited to visit there in church. We want to visit there in the evening so I would be glad If you suggest me that there is any bus are available in evening from bus stand or can I get any taxi or other vehicle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Seema, I am sure there are plenty of buses from the main city bus stand, but plenty of autos and taxis are also easily available from anywhere in the city.

      Delete
  3. This church appears to bring an European flavour in India. It is amazing how the churches built in the Neo Gothic style seem to resemble each other very much, and yet they are so different. It would be nice to go on a holiday and visit different famous churches around the world, or to visit various churches across the same country.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Beautiful photographs of the Church. Last week I had been there and had a lovely time.

    ReplyDelete

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