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Tanjore and Mysore Paintings at the CSMVS Mumbai

A chubby, naked, fair Krishna , holding a butter ball, covered in golden ornaments, Yashoda by his side, an indulgent smile on her face, even as her finger is raised in admonition. Rama and Sita seated on the throne, Lakshmana on one side, Bharata and Shatrughna on the other, surrounded by sages and kings; Rama a distinctive green in colour. These are both popular themes in Tanjore Art. I first saw both these in temples, the Navaneetha Krishna in many homes as well, if not original, at least a recent replica or just a copy. The Ramar Pattabhishekam I have better memories of, having seen it often at the Matunga Bhajan Samaj in Mumbai, as well as at my mother-in-law’s ancestral house in Thanjavur. The latter especially is close to our family’s heart, and it’s an exquisite piece of work, the expressions on Rama and Sita’s faces as intricately done as the gold work that surrounds them. Navaneetha Krishna Beautiful as they are , to me, they are associated with divinity more than just wor

Shveta Varahaswamy Temple, Mysore Palace

There are 12 temples inside the Mysore Palace complex. Some of these are ancient ones, which stood long before the palace was built, while others are relatively recent, having been built by the royal family in different periods. Among these, it is the Shveta Varahaswamy Temple which is the most prominent, since it is located right next to the present entrance to the palace.

Varaha over the main doorway





Varaha is the third avatar or incarnation of Lord Vishnu, the family deity of the Wodeyars. He appears in the form of a wild boar,bringing out the earth (Bhu-devi) from the ocean. The idol being made of white stone, He is called ‘Shveta (white) Varahaswamy. It is said that the idol was brought from Srimushnam in Tamilnadu, by Chikka Devaraja Wodeyar (1672-1704), and consecrated at a new temple in Srirangapatna, which was then their capital. In 1809, the deity was brought to Mysore and consecrated in this temple by Diwan Purnaiah as per the wishes of Krishna Raja Wodeyar III.




The temple is built in the typical Hoysala style of architecture with intricate work over the doorways and pillars. 




There is also a separate shrine for the goddess. 



One of the interesting things about this temple are the paintings representing the Ramayana and Bhagavata on the walls of the pillared hall. Unfortunately, cameras aren’t allowed inside the temple, so I have no photos of these. Instead, here is a depiction of the Dashavatar (the 10 incarnations of Lord Vishnu) over the doorway…

Narasimha... killing the demon Hiranyakasipu

Narasimha in a different pose... as Lakshmi Narasimha accompanied by smaller ircons of Dashavatars... the one on the left is Vamana. I cant identify the one on the right. Looks a bit like Garuda. 

Some of the Dashavatars/.. the central one is Rama. see the smaller icons of Matsya, Kurma and Varaha

I am sharing this post today with SkyWatch Friday. True, there isnt much of the sky in these pics, but standing in the palace complex, looking around, the temples with their majestic gopurams were the most visible on the skyline! For more beautiful skies from around the world, visit the Skywatch page. 

Comments

  1. Wow, Gorgeous! Indeed, extraordinary architecture...like your tour.
    Really, you have an Amazing Blog, Anu! I glad that found your blog and continually enjoying your new posts and/or a follower at your blog. but now I hope, you'll be a follower and commenter. Indeed, I have also very informative and interesting blog..Have a nice day..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much. I havent been able to see a lot of blogs recently, but when i start to catch up, I surely will read yours. hope to keep seeing u here.

      Delete
  2. Very beautiful photos for SWF!Have a nice weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Beautifully covered. I have been wanting to do this for long now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rajesh! would love to read your impressions of the temple too.

      Delete
  4. Wonderful architectures. Nice shots.

    http://rajniranjandas.blogspot.in/

    ReplyDelete

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